At the Huts of Ajala, fiction by Nisi Shawl

“The main difference is her head. Or the lack of it; her head is not there. In its place are rays of shimmering light that stream down from a luminous ball floating nearly a foot above the stem of her graceful neck.”   THEY ALL KEEP CALLING her a “two-headed woman.” Loanna wants to know […]

Gingko, Pigeon, Light: A Fable, fiction by M.C. Boyes

* “It’s not like the bird has a key.” A MAN AND A WOMAN PLAN to marry. In anticipation of their union they purchase a house in the historic district of their small southern city. The house is white with lovely woodwork that has been neglected and high ceilings that have cracked over time. The man […]

Weird Pairings, Borges + Dublin Library

The Quote: Jorge Luis Borges was an Argentine writer who was postmodern way before postmodernism was a Thing. He was writing magical realist stories just as magical realism was becoming a Thing. He started his writing career publishing in surrealist literary journals when surrealism was The Thing. This places Borges front and center of nearly […]

A Review of The Ocean at the End of the Lane, by Neil Gaiman

Delightful, Enchanting and Scary Review by Rowan Randol Do you remember what it feels like to be a child, able to believe in the possibility of magic? This book transported me back to, once again, believing in the delightful world of make believe … or is it? The story starts off with a death and […]

A Review of Little Brother, by Cory Doctorow

If You’re Not Doing Anything Wrong… Book Review by Melanie Lamaga Marcus Yallow is a 17-year old geek genius living in a near-future San Francisco where kids are monitored constantly by cyber-security on their school-issued laptops, radio frequency ID chips in their library books, and gait recognition software in the halls. Marcus delights in getting […]

A Review of Brown Girl in the Ring, by Nalo Hopkinson

Serving the Spirits In this near future, post-apocalyptic Toronto, the wealthy live in the suburbs. In the inner city, government and social structures have disintegrated after a series of riots. “The ones who couldn’t or wouldn’t get out,” use a system of barter, and live under the shadow of crime-lord Rudy and his posse. Ti-Jeanne, […]

A Review of the Short Stories of Kelly Link

Nobody writes cooler stories than Kelly Link. Link’s stories draw from fairy tales, myth, pop culture, experimental, horror, gothic, and detective fiction, the tabloids, dreams, nightmares, and half a dozen other things. But this is not merely pulp fiction—wham, bam, thrill and chill. Link uses the tools of pulp fiction to deal with literary concerns: […]

A Review of Waking the Moon, by Elizabeth Hand

The Moon with a Knife-Sharp Edge Three unwitting college students stand between the reawakening of a dark goddess and the Benandanti, a secret society of magicians who have been running the world for thousands of years. Waking the Moon, which won a Mythopoeic Award and a James Tiptree, Jr. Award, is part horror, part coming […]

A Review of Zoo City, by Lauren Beukes

A Noir Detective Pagan Cyberpunk Novel Zoo City is a ghetto in Johannesburg, populated by outcasts. Each person there is marked by the wild animal that appears just after they kill someone (intentionally or not). Animal and human become extensions of one another, and any “Zoo” unfortunate enough to lose her animal gets a visit […]

A Review of Among Others by Jo Walton

This very readable book (which won the Nebula Award for Best Novel this year) is part coming of age, part fantasy and part uber-geek love-letter to the classics of science fiction. Much of the drama has already happened before the novel starts. We learn that Morwenna and her twin sister Morganna spent their childhoods playing […]