Robot Story, fiction by Dennis Danvers

The only thing ordinary about Jane was her name. She reminded me of a praying mantis, though it was hard to imagine Jane praying. She was tall and skinny but muscular like Sarah Connor in the second Terminator movie. She could walk on her hands. She showed me the night we met.

A Review of Skein and Bone, by V.H. Leslie

by Paul St. John Mackintosh
Exquisitely disturbing tales
V.H. Leslie is an artist and printmaker, as well as a very fine writer, and a member of England’s Omega Printmakers in Portsmouth. The fourteen dark and weird stories in this first collection are as finely crafted as you’d expect from her background, and as mysteriously suggestive as any cryptic design. Her work has been compared to Shirley Jackson or M.R. James, but is completely modern in its fantastic, surreal flavor.

Up the Fire Road (part two), fiction by Eileen Gunn

* “Was I on some kind of strange drug? Was I in the woods at all? Was I at my mom’s house, and having some kind of a psychotic episode?” Read PART ONE of “Up the Fire Road” HERE.   Andrea Mickey wasn’t bad in bed. He was younger than I had thought, and he […]

Up the Fire Road (part one), fiction by Eileen Gunn

* “If life seems slow and meaningless, go somewhere where you depend on Christy to get you back.” (“Up the Fire Road” originally appeared in Eclipse One.) Andrea The main thing to understand about Christy O’Hare is he hates being bored. Complicated is interesting, simple is dull, so he likes to make things complicated. Used […]

Butterflies, fiction by Zoe Fowler

* “I am well versed in fairy tales where centuries skitter past in less than a sentence, but in reality, when one is lying all dressed up in one’s finest garments with whalebone corsetry digging deep in the spaces between one’s ribs, each day stretches out like a possible lifetime and all one can do […]

At the Huts of Ajala, fiction by Nisi Shawl

“The main difference is her head. Or the lack of it; her head is not there. In its place are rays of shimmering light that stream down from a luminous ball floating nearly a foot above the stem of her graceful neck.”   THEY ALL KEEP CALLING her a “two-headed woman.” Loanna wants to know […]

A Review of Brown Girl in the Ring, by Nalo Hopkinson

Serving the Spirits In this near future, post-apocalyptic Toronto, the wealthy live in the suburbs. In the inner city, government and social structures have disintegrated after a series of riots. “The ones who couldn’t or wouldn’t get out,” use a system of barter, and live under the shadow of crime-lord Rudy and his posse. Ti-Jeanne, […]

A Review of the Short Stories of Kelly Link

Nobody writes cooler stories than Kelly Link. Link’s stories draw from fairy tales, myth, pop culture, experimental, horror, gothic, and detective fiction, the tabloids, dreams, nightmares, and half a dozen other things. But this is not merely pulp fiction—wham, bam, thrill and chill. Link uses the tools of pulp fiction to deal with literary concerns: […]

A Review of Waking the Moon, by Elizabeth Hand

The Moon with a Knife-Sharp Edge Three unwitting college students stand between the reawakening of a dark goddess and the Benandanti, a secret society of magicians who have been running the world for thousands of years. Waking the Moon, which won a Mythopoeic Award and a James Tiptree, Jr. Award, is part horror, part coming […]

A Review of Illyria, by Elizabeth Hand

An Elegant Explosion of Repressed Creativity and Desire This is beautifully written, Romantic (in the 18th century sense, not the Danielle Steele sense) novella about soul mates, forbidden love, and being a magical child in a family that’s lost its mojo. It’s also about talent, both the kind that emerges full-blown and the kind that […]